REVIEW festival Isle Of Wight Festival

Left My Heart At The Isle Of Wight

 

It’s not very often that you get home from a festival with genuine excitement to write a review, but Isle of Wight was an exception. From start to finish my experience can only be described as magical.

The attention to detail of the festival organizers was fantastic, from the surprisingly clean toilets, countless activities and phenomenal performances. The only complaint I have about the entire weekend is the seemingly never-ending walk from the campsite to main stage.

The festival had a diverse range of guests from those old enough to have seen Queen and The Who, ‘back in their day’ to an annoying group of 15 year olds who were aggressively shouting ‘Allan, Steve’ in the campsite at 3 am.

The highlights of the weekend for me were Gabrielle Aplin, Sigma, Queen, Busted and every moment I spent in The Hip Shaker Tent. Friday night was well spent seeing The Cure Heads singing my heart out to ‘Friday I’m in love’, undoubtedly one of the best tribute acts I’ve ever seen, and a massive crowd favourite. Sadly ‘Noasis’ had to cancel but were replaced by an early 2000’s late 90’s disco, which swarmed a crowd to Hipshaker on the Saturday evening.

Gabrielle Aplin’s set was phenomenal, it was my first time seeing the ‘Power of Love’ singer and after that performance it definitely won’t be my last. Her cover of The Weeknd’s ‘Can’t feel my face’ created one of the most electrifying atmospheres of the weekend.

Although Sigma was not an act I even had considered seeing before the weekend it was insane, I don’t think I’ve ever been in a better crowd. There’s not much more than I can say but that it was phenomenal, ‘Coming Home’ being a massive highlight for me of their set.

Queen, well what can I say. I never thought I’d be able to say in my lifetime that I’d of got to see them, thank you Isle of Wight for blessing me with that. I have to say I was skeptical at first after growing up with such a love towards Freddie Mercury but Adam Lambert showed such passion and dedication and certainly didn’t disappoint. ‘Crazy thing called love’ was my favourite of the goose bump worthy set.

Busted awoke my five year old self, it’s everything I wanted it to be, crazy how so many years later I can still sing along word for word.

Overall the weekend was incredible, leaving broke my heart. If you’re looking for a festival that’s guaranteed an incredible line up, experience and to help you meet some lovely people venture down to Isle of Wight next year.


THE CUREHEADS

MROCKFEST
MROCKFEST

Grupa The Cureheads powstała w 1990 roku w Sztokholmie pod nazwą Fat Bob And The Cureheads. Współzałożycielem zespołu był Gary Clarke, były wokalista kultowej, brytyjskiej formacji gotyckiej Nosferatu. W 1994 roku FBATC zagrali premierową trasę koncertową po Wielkiej Brytanii. W 1995 roku grupa była gościem Wave Gotik Treffen w Lipsku, rok później zagrała kolejną trasę po Wielkiej Brytanii. W 2000 r. Gary Clarke postanowił, że zespół przestanie być parodią The Cure, a stanie się hołdem dla formacji Roberta Smitha. Skontaktował się wówczas z Itą Martin z wytwórni Fiction Records wydającej albumy The Cure i postanowił skrócić nazwę zespołu do The Cureheads. Wkrótce po koncercie The Cure w Wembley Arena promującym album "Bloodflowers", Cureheads zagrali znakomicie przyjęty show w londyńskim klubie Underworld. Był to początek nowego etapu w działalności Cureheads. Zespół stał się obiektem zainteresowania promotorów i w ciągu kolejnych dwóch lat zagrał serię koncertów w Stanach Zjednoczonych, Wielkiej Brytanii i w Europie. Sława The Cureheads rosła. Zespół otrzymywał coraz więcej propozycji koncertowych. Między innymi w 2002 roku zagrał jako jedna z gwiazd na Guildford Festival, obok Echo And The Bunnymen i The Pretenders. W kwietniu 2003 roku, wraz z włoskim zespołem Easy Cure, brytyjską gwiazdą rocka gotyckiego Incubus Succubus, The Curheads wystąpili na światowym zlocie fanów The Cure w londyńskim Camden Palace. W 2004 roku Cureheads zagrali fantastycznie przyjętą trasę koncertową po Holandii, po której napłynęły zaproszenia z Francji, Portugalii, Hiszpanii i wschodniej Europy. Obecnie w The Cureheads gra ostródzianin, były lider grupy Thule – Marian Filarski.


 Also playing: The Cureheads

azette

 

Kitchen Sink feat THE CUREHEADS
Ku Bar, Stockton Tomorrow Entry £6

The Cureheads

TOP tribute band THE CUREHEADS may sing Friday I’m In Love, but it’s a Saturday that brings them to Teesside.

The group are heading to Stockton tomorrow night to headline the weekly Kitchen Sink gig at the town’s Ku Bar venue.

The tribute to Robert Smith and co are this year celebrating getting the key to the door as they mark their 21st anniversary as a group.

They consider themselves “the luckiest tribute band in the world”, having played to more than half a million Cure fans all over the world since 1990.

Their name is taken from the Irish slang term for anyone with that “1980’s mop haired Gothic look”. They were originally known as “Fat Bob & The Cureheads” until 2000.

The group play all the hits, including the aforementioned Friday I’m In Love, as well as The Lovecats, Inbetween Days, Boys Don’t Cry and Close To Me.

They have also now added to their ranks Andy Anderson on drums, who formerly beat the skins for “the real Cure”.


 

Emma Seaman http://www.emmaseaman.co.uk/blog/tag/the-cureheads/

Cureheads

Originally called ‘Fat Bob and The Cureheads’ they’ve performed with various line-ups for over 25 years. They recently played to 10,000 fans in Chile, where The Cure are very popular (but have never toured). They inspire professional rivalry in the USA’s ‘top’ Cure tribute band – there’s only room for one fake Robert Smith…


 



The Cure vs. The Smiths -The Tribute Wars:

"This Weekend I was CURED by a man in red Lippy, then visually assaulted by a man holding flowers and wearing a rather nice cardigan". Along with six hundred other thirty somethings I found myself crammed into a dark basement below the world famous World's End Pub, In Camden Town North London. We were here to witness the climax of a fued held since the early 1980's between arguably 2 of Britain's biggest ever rock acts. The Smiths and The Cure.

Represented by in The Blue corner for The Smiths; All the way from LA USA "The Delicate Young Hooligans" & in The Red Corner For The Cure on thier home turf "The Cureheads". The tribute scene in England has been rife with awful Abba & Beatles tributes for years now, sparked off no doubt by the awful ITV Karaoke challenge; " Stars in Their Eyes" which sees Derick The Dyslexic Digger Driver put away his builder's crack for half an hour to truly believe that he looks and sounds exactly like Pavarotti to the applause of 200 pensioners who have been promised the autograph of that nice man Mathew Kelly if they behave themselves & clap in all the right places.

Tonight is definately different. The Cure although still hugely popular & active in Europe & The States, have faded somewhat in popularity in The U.K. over the last few years. This is echoed several times when I ask different people why they are here to spend money to see a tribute to a band that has not yet officially ended. "You maybe get to see the Cure in England once every 5 years. Even then they never seem to put the same effort into it as they do abroad", is the shouted answer I get from Simon a Plasterer who has travelled from Northampton in The Cure T-Shirt that he informs me is over 15 years old. "It's better than staying in and waiting for The Cure to come around and play. These guys (The Cureheads) are good too & they have a laugh", is Jenny's reason for travelling from Cambridge tonight. Not misled in the least by the fact that their heroes have seemingly desserted them The Cure fans seem to heavily out number the Smiths fans 2-1.

The atmosphere is building as we watch the sets of two other tributes to Gary Numan & The Essex boys Depeche Mode. After another hour and 3 more beers I am begining to enjoy myself and actually am quite excited when The Lights dim & Through the smoke I see a Ghostly Apparition of what really does appear to be; The Cure forming. The crowd push forward as the first heavy bass notes of a song I've never heard before pull me forward too. Then a song I recognise from The Cure's Last album Bloodflowers. Now I can compare.

The Hooligans have travelled from LA for tonight, which begin's their first UK tour. When their Morrissey man runs on and showers the crowd with Daffs & Gladioli they are in the palm of his hands till the end of the set,only breifly interrupted by a staged theatrical fight between Morrissey & The Cureheads vocalist which ended with the whole audience onstage for a drunken rendition of "Midnight" & The Cure & The Smiths arm in arm. So are tribute bands a good thing or a bad thing? I dont know. I'll leave it for you to decide. I was too busy enjoying myself to check.

Bryan Forbes"


 

Lancashire Telegraph

Blackburn show for goth tribute band The Cureheads

The Cureheads on stage

IT’S not every day you can see a rock band with some stand-up comedy thrown in.

But then it’s not every day you can get to see The Cureheads.

For the past 22 years they have been recreating the sound and look of The Cure, one of the most influential bands of the Eighties.

But a Curehead show — which comes to Blackburn’s King George’s Hall next Friday — is more than a setlist of classics.

Gary Clarke, the band’s own Robert Smith said: “The first five or songs are done completely in character which tends to get the hard core fans on side. Then we get a bit more relaxed and there may be a few quips and some observations from me. “When we first did this it was looked on as heresy by some Cure fans but they have come to realise that we are all huge fans of the band ourselves and that we are sincere in what we do.”

The Cureheads have developed a following almost as loyal as the band they pay tribute to. “We have played basketball stadiums in South America in front of 15,000 people,” said Gary. “It’s an amazing experience as the crowd are so into the songs. They know them as well as we do and look for every nuance in the performance. “As Robert Smith I can just throw in a certain glance or gesture which they all recognise and the place goes wild.”Gary has had a different reaction when The Cureheads have played closer to home.

“By day I’m the principal of a private school in Edinburgh,” he said. “We have played gigs when the first thing I’ve known about pupils being in the audience is when I can hear ‘Sir, sir’ coming from the front row which can be pretty off-putting.”Gary has fond memories of the band’s last visit to Blackburn. “It was a great night,” he said. “We played at the North Bar and the place was packed. I remember we went outside and played an acoustic song as more people tried to cram in.“The Cure are still going strong and coming up with new material,” said Gary, “but we tend to stick to what fans see as classic Cure. We’ve even started to write our own Cure album for a bit of fun.”

The Cureheads sound is amazingly authentic, part helped by the fact that the Cure’s guitar and keys technicians are both involved in the band. “We have learned songs note by note, we have the same gear and we strive to be as authentic as we can because we are all big time fans,” said Gary. “But with the live shows we also want everyone to have some fun too.”

 


 

Review: The Cureheads, The Greyhound, Beeston

By NottmPostEG  |  Posted: November 01, 2013

 
Forget trick-or-treat or themed club nights. The place to be this Halloween was The Greyhound in Beeston. With The Cureheads, the ‘original tribute to The Cure since 1990’, topping the bill it would be hard to find a more suitable act for an occasion celebrating all things dark, Gothic and mysterious.
 

Bravely, the band open with ‘Burn’; its long instrumental intro holding back the first lyrics, perhaps the most important moment of any tribute band show. If we were to close our eyes, does this sound like the real deal? Thankfully, Gary Clarke gets it spot-on, imitating Robert Smith’s distinctive, youthful vocals.

Technical problems early-on with an acoustic guitar prompt a dialogue between frontman and audience, something it would be hard to imagine from the famously introvert ‘poster child of doom and gloom’. Nonetheless, an excellent ‘From The Edge Of The Deep Green Sea’ more than makes up for the delay.

Throughout the first-half of the show Clarke gives the impression of being no Cure obsessive. He tells us that he discovered the band whist in pursuit of a young female, and when the conversation moves on to collectable double LPs, it is bassist Sean Flude - the “Cure nerd” - who is consulted as a final authority. The songs played early on, however, hardly suggest that there are any fair-weather fans on stage.

That being said, more upbeat Cure is impossible to ignore. To use Clarke’s own words, the band go “all poppy and sh*t now” as they rattle through ‘Primary’, ‘Pictures of You’, an excellent ‘Lullaby’, ‘Lovesong’, birthday request ‘Doing The Unstuck’, ‘In Between Days’, ‘Just Like Heaven’, and an extended rendition of ‘A Forest’.

‘Boys Don’t Cry’ and ‘Friday I’m In Love’ feature toward the end of a set which offers more than just the predictable hits. Impressively, The Cureheads do not fall into the trap of raw punk-type covers which a pub might lend itself to, but instead do justice to the more ethereal, atmospheric and complex nature of the songs.

On their website, The Cureheads state that they ‘don’t play very often’. On the basis of tonight’s impressive 90 minute plus show, that will be due to personal preference rather than a lack of demand.


Read more: http://www.nottinghampost.com/review-cureheads-greyhound-beeston/story-20021463-detail/story.html#ixzz4ETzA5Wln
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